By Austin Sheeley

There are a lot of mobility devices out there. We should know. We sell several of them. Some devices, like rollators, help a wide variety of users. Others, like posterior safety rollers, are more specific and help a smaller group of users.

Then, there’s the Paragolfer—a device specifically designed to help those without the use of their legs play golf.

One such user is Mike Downing, a veteran sergeant who lost both legs in an explosion in Afghanistan. And though it took him a while to get back into the swing of golf, he soon regained control of his hits. According to Downing, “It’s like anything else; it’s getting used to it.”

Though the Paragolfer was designed specifically for golf, users have found it provides other benefits. Those once restricted to wheelchairs and power scooters can now, if they choose, stand upright and communicate with others at eye level. Since it was made for golf, the Paragolfer allows unrestricted shoulder movement, a benefit many paraplegics did not previously have.

All in all, the Paragolfer is another great example of how mobility technology continues to improve. We’ve gotten to the point where almost anyone with the funding and desire can move around. Now we’re tackling more specific, but still important obstacles—like golf.